Our unique history

Founded in 1910, John Taylor Hospice is the oldest non-denominational hospice in the country. Our staff and volunteers have been providing care for people in the West Midlands for 110 years – making every moment matter for thousands of people over the decades.

Our timeline picks out some of the key points or highlights in the hospice’s amazing history.

Thank you to Library of Birmingham, Erdington History Society and the League of Friends of John Taylor Hospice for the use of their photographs.

26 Feb – Death of Professor John Taylor.

22 April – Public meeting held at Birmingham Council House and resolution passed to set up Taylor Memorial Home of Rest for women suffering from gynaecological cancers.

11 June – The Taylor Memorial Home opens in Park Road, Sparkhill for five to six patients.

 

1911- Taylor Memorial Home moves to Showell Green House in Sparkhill where it expands and can now take up to 20 patients.

1924 – Death of Dr Mary Darby Sturge, founder of the Taylor Memorial Home and former colleague of John Taylor. Dr Sturge was the second woman doctor in Birmingham and a suffragette.

1925 – Dr Mary Sturge Memorial Wing extension to Taylor Memorial Home at Showell Green House to accommodate nurses and domestic staff.

1931- Veranda added to the front of the home forming an extra ward for four patients.

1933 – Death of Dr Christopher Martin, Chair of the Taylor Memorial Home Management Committee and benefactor, known to patients as ‘St Christopher’.

1935 – BBC Radio Appeal marks the 25th anniversary of the Taylor Memorial Home.

December 1940 – Taylor Memorial Home closed following the landing of bombs in the garden of Showell Green House.

June 1941 – Taylor Memorial Home moves and is re-opened at White Lodge in Cannock.

July 1945 – The Grange, former home of Sir Benjamin Stone MP, is purchased for the Taylor Memorial Home.

July 1948 – Taylor Memorial Home is gifted to the NHS by its Management Committee and the home becomes part of Dudley Road Group of Hospitals.

 

1950 – Renovation work is completed at The Grange and the Taylor Memorial Home re-opens in Grange Road, Erdington.

24 January 1961 – Fire breaks out at the home and neighbours in the adjacent Greenside Road help evacuate patients.

 

1974 – League of Friends formed to support the work of the Taylor Memorial Home.

Mid-1970s – The home begins admitting men and patients with conditions other than cancer.

 

The home continues to expand its care introducing community services and a day hospice.

The Taylor Memorial Home is renamed John Taylor Hospice.

1997 – The Inpatient Unit opens a new wing funded by the League of Friends.

2009 – Multi-Disciplinary Team is formed to offer patients occupational therapy, physiotherapy, pharmacy and specialist clinics such as the Fatigue, Anxiety and Breathlessness Programme.

1 October 2011 – John Taylor Hospice leaves the NHS to become a community interest company. It launches its motto ‘every moment matters’. Hundreds of local people join John Taylor Hospice’s Walk for Change to celebrate.

18 December 2011- John Taylor Hospice holds its first Light up a Life.

September 2013 – The Care Quality Commission gives John Taylor Hospice top marks in its first inspection since leaving the NHS.

Summer 2014 – John Taylor Hospice rebrands, launching its distinctive turquoise colour, dot detail and gift tag logo.

April 2017 – Life:Moving, an exhibition of films made by John Taylor Hospice patients and families opens at St Barnabas Church in Erdington and then moves to Birmingham Repertory Theatre.

2018 – John Taylor Hospice becomes a charity and opens its first shops in Erdington, Wylde Green and Castle Bromwich.

2019 – The fourth John Taylor Hospice shop opens in Brownhills and the hospice holds its first Sunset Walk.

John Taylor Hospice will be celebrating its 110th anniversary with a host of events throughout 2020 – see you there!

1 Jan – John Taylor Hospice launches Making Every Moment Matter: Our Three-Year Strategic Plan 2020-2023. Download a copy here.

1910

26 Feb – Death of Professor John Taylor.

22 April – Public meeting held at Birmingham Council House and resolution passed to set up Taylor Memorial Home of Rest for women suffering from gynaecological cancers.

11 June – The Taylor Memorial Home opens in Park Road, Sparkhill for five to six patients.

 

1911

1911- Taylor Memorial Home moves to Showell Green House in Sparkhill where it expands and can now take up to 20 patients.

1920s

1924 – Death of Dr Mary Darby Sturge, founder of the Taylor Memorial Home and former colleague of John Taylor. Dr Sturge was the second woman doctor in Birmingham and a suffragette.

1925 – Dr Mary Sturge Memorial Wing extension to Taylor Memorial Home at Showell Green House to accommodate nurses and domestic staff.

1930s

1931- Veranda added to the front of the home forming an extra ward for four patients.

1933 – Death of Dr Christopher Martin, Chair of the Taylor Memorial Home Management Committee and benefactor, known to patients as ‘St Christopher’.

1935 – BBC Radio Appeal marks the 25th anniversary of the Taylor Memorial Home.

1940s

December 1940 – Taylor Memorial Home closed following the landing of bombs in the garden of Showell Green House.

June 1941 – Taylor Memorial Home moves and is re-opened at White Lodge in Cannock.

July 1945 – The Grange, former home of Sir Benjamin Stone MP, is purchased for the Taylor Memorial Home.

July 1948 – Taylor Memorial Home is gifted to the NHS by its Management Committee and the home becomes part of Dudley Road Group of Hospitals.

 

1950s

1950 – Renovation work is completed at The Grange and the Taylor Memorial Home re-opens in Grange Road, Erdington.

1960s

24 January 1961 – Fire breaks out at the home and neighbours in the adjacent Greenside Road help evacuate patients.

 

1970s

1974 – League of Friends formed to support the work of the Taylor Memorial Home.

Mid-1970s – The home begins admitting men and patients with conditions other than cancer.

 

1980s

The home continues to expand its care introducing community services and a day hospice.

1990s

The Taylor Memorial Home is renamed John Taylor Hospice.

1997 – The Inpatient Unit opens a new wing funded by the League of Friends.

2000s

2009 – Multi-Disciplinary Team is formed to offer patients occupational therapy, physiotherapy, pharmacy and specialist clinics such as the Fatigue, Anxiety and Breathlessness Programme.

2010s

1 October 2011 – John Taylor Hospice leaves the NHS to become a community interest company. It launches its motto ‘every moment matters’. Hundreds of local people join John Taylor Hospice’s Walk for Change to celebrate.

18 December 2011- John Taylor Hospice holds its first Light up a Life.

September 2013 – The Care Quality Commission gives John Taylor Hospice top marks in its first inspection since leaving the NHS.

Summer 2014 – John Taylor Hospice rebrands, launching its distinctive turquoise colour, dot detail and gift tag logo.

April 2017 – Life:Moving, an exhibition of films made by John Taylor Hospice patients and families opens at St Barnabas Church in Erdington and then moves to Birmingham Repertory Theatre.

2018 – John Taylor Hospice becomes a charity and opens its first shops in Erdington, Wylde Green and Castle Bromwich.

2019 – The fourth John Taylor Hospice shop opens in Brownhills and the hospice holds its first Sunset Walk.

2020

John Taylor Hospice will be celebrating its 110th anniversary with a host of events throughout 2020 – see you there!

1 Jan – John Taylor Hospice launches Making Every Moment Matter: Our Three-Year Strategic Plan 2020-2023. Download a copy here.

What our patients think

“The care was second to none”

“At such a heartbreaking and difficult time, the nurses and care assistants knew exactly what to do and to say – we’d have been lost without them. The care they provided for my beautiful wife was second to none and I’ll be forever grateful.”

Roger Perks

“Nothing is too much trouble”

“I can’t thank hospice teams enough. From fitting grab rails in my house and ordering a reclining bed, reviewing of all my medication, providing me with new medical equipment and even helping to organise domestic help for us at home – they’ve covered everything but are always willing to do even more.”

Jackie Bannister

“I don’t know where I’d be without them”

“The support I get is truly is invaluable and I honestly don’t know where I’d be without them. I’m able to talk openly about my illness and ask for advice and support if I need it. I’ve made some incredible friends and the hospice is a very special place full of laughter and kindness. “

Liz Warren

Light up a Life and celebrate your loved ones