Hope and Healing Appeal

Help us to raise £10,000 to give more children the strength and confidence to open up, express their feelings and realise they are not alone. To make a donation today please visit www.justgiving.com/campaign/hopeandhealing

Children who have been bereaved can feel many different emotions such as sadness, guilt, anger, fear, confusion and insecurity. At group sessions, like those held at John Taylor Hospice, children are supported by an experienced counsellor and an art therapist to talk openly about their feelings and worries. These groups can help children whose loved one has died through one of the toughest and loneliest times in their lives.

 

In a safe space, children are able to share their experiences, talk about their feelings and let their worries out. Many bereaved children may feel confused, or have overheard things they find scary, so the groups give them a chance to ask questions and to grow in self-esteem and confidence. By developing a bond with each other they do not feel so alone in their grief.

A child whose loved one has died may not have the words to express their grief. Art therapy can help children to communicate powerful emotions they might struggle to verbalise. Creative art is also a way to reflect upon special memories, remember happy times and feel reassured that there is hope for the future.

Earlier this year, we held a pilot support group for children at John Taylor Hospice. The help it gave to the children taking part showed how much this support service is valued and that it should be continued – to give more children the chance to open up, express their feelings and realise they are not alone.

  • £12 could pay for art therapy supplies
  • £35 could pay for one child to attend a group session
  • £208 could fund a full programme of six support sessions

To make a donation today visit www.justgiving.com/campaign/hopeandhealing

Vicki says: “My daughter Siobhan was only 25 when she died. After the death of his mommy, Siobhan’s little boy Cruz was so brave but found it very difficult to talk about his feelings. We realise now that he was bottling up his emotions, trying to process what had happened and wanting to protect us. By speaking to other children in the group who’d lost parents and grandparents he felt reassured and realised he wasn’t alone. It’s helped us as family too as talking gives us strength and means we can share happy, precious memories of Siobhan.”

Read Vicki and Cruz’s story here.

Shabnam says: “My children, aged nine and 11, particularly enjoyed art therapy and the drawings they created were very expressive. We will treasure the paintings they did and it’s something I encourage at home now. At the last session my children were provided with a love stone which they both treasure and hold in the palm of their hand as a source of comfort when they are feeling a little sad. They tell me it makes them feel better when they do this.”

Read Shabnam’s story here.

Giving hope and help to heal

Children who have been bereaved can feel many different emotions such as sadness, guilt, anger, fear, confusion and insecurity. At group sessions, like those held at John Taylor Hospice, children are supported by an experienced counsellor and an art therapist to talk openly about their feelings and worries. These groups can help children whose loved one has died through one of the toughest and loneliest times in their lives.

 

Counselling and group time

In a safe space, children are able to share their experiences, talk about their feelings and let their worries out. Many bereaved children may feel confused, or have overheard things they find scary, so the groups give them a chance to ask questions and to grow in self-esteem and confidence. By developing a bond with each other they do not feel so alone in their grief.

Art therapy

A child whose loved one has died may not have the words to express their grief. Art therapy can help children to communicate powerful emotions they might struggle to verbalise. Creative art is also a way to reflect upon special memories, remember happy times and feel reassured that there is hope for the future.

How to donate

Earlier this year, we held a pilot support group for children at John Taylor Hospice. The help it gave to the children taking part showed how much this support service is valued and that it should be continued – to give more children the chance to open up, express their feelings and realise they are not alone.

  • £12 could pay for art therapy supplies
  • £35 could pay for one child to attend a group session
  • £208 could fund a full programme of six support sessions

To make a donation today visit www.justgiving.com/campaign/hopeandhealing

Vicki`s story

Vicki says: “My daughter Siobhan was only 25 when she died. After the death of his mommy, Siobhan’s little boy Cruz was so brave but found it very difficult to talk about his feelings. We realise now that he was bottling up his emotions, trying to process what had happened and wanting to protect us. By speaking to other children in the group who’d lost parents and grandparents he felt reassured and realised he wasn’t alone. It’s helped us as family too as talking gives us strength and means we can share happy, precious memories of Siobhan.”

Read Vicki and Cruz’s story here.

Shabnam`s story

Shabnam says: “My children, aged nine and 11, particularly enjoyed art therapy and the drawings they created were very expressive. We will treasure the paintings they did and it’s something I encourage at home now. At the last session my children were provided with a love stone which they both treasure and hold in the palm of their hand as a source of comfort when they are feeling a little sad. They tell me it makes them feel better when they do this.”

Read Shabnam’s story here.

What our patients think

“The care was second to none”

“At such a heartbreaking and difficult time, the nurses and care assistants knew exactly what to do and to say – we’d have been lost without them. The care they provided for my beautiful wife was second to none and I’ll be forever grateful.”

Roger Perks

“Nothing is too much trouble”

“I can’t thank hospice teams enough. From fitting grab rails in my house and ordering a reclining bed, reviewing of all my medication, providing me with new medical equipment and even helping to organise domestic help for us at home – they’ve covered everything but are always willing to do even more.”

Jackie Bannister

“I don’t know where I’d be without them”

“The support I get is truly is invaluable and I honestly don’t know where I’d be without them. I’m able to talk openly about my illness and ask for advice and support if I need it. I’ve made some incredible friends and the hospice is a very special place full of laughter and kindness. “

Liz Warren

Hope and Healing Appeal